Gov. Cuomo slammed as 'Big Apple's biggest bigot' for coronavirus restrictions on houses of worship

Catholic diocese asks Supreme Court to halt Cuomo’s coronavirus restrictions against houses of worship

Montse Alvarado, executive director of The Becket Fund, reacts, on ‘Fox & Friends,’ to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn challenging New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s COVID-19 restrictions on churches at the Supreme Court.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration is discriminating against houses of worship with coronavirus restrictions, Montse Alvarado, Becket Fund for Religious Liberty executive director, told "Fox & Friends" Friday.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn is waiting for relief after turning to the Supreme Court Thursday to fight back against Cuomo's restrictions on houses of worship on the grounds of religious freedom.

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"This has been restriction after restriction," Alvarado said, slamming Cuomo as "the Big Apple's biggest bigot" and saying they've had "zero success" working with his administration.

In this June 15, 2020, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo removes a mask as he holds a news conference in Tarrytown, N.Y. On Wednesday, Cuomo announced new coronavirus restrictions that take effect Friday. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

"He goes after communities of faith, specifically the Jewish community, and having other communities then get caught in that crossfire, where they have to go out and go to the Supreme Court, the highest court in the land, for relief. It's ridiculous and it is unscientific," Alvarado said.

Cuomo’s order limited services at houses of worship to no more than 10 people in red zones, regardless of the size of the building, with orange zones capped at 25 and yellow zones at 50% capacity.

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"The churches have had this incredible protocol that they put in place even before it was required by the government," Alvarado argued, "and they haven't had a single event of COVID spreading. These are safe places."

She added: "These are communities that want to create these safe opportunities for people to gather so they don't get depressed so that they don't have issues with alcoholism. We're seeing crazy things happen to people's mental stability with COVID and the solution here is solace and spiritual relief, not limitations."

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Alvarado said the diocese is hoping to get a response soon after appealing to Justice Stephen Breyer after a lower court previously ruled against it.

Fox News' Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

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