EU warned: Italian PM’s new leadership will ‘facilitate fight to leave’ Brussels bloc

Mario Draghi: Eurozone 'cannot accept' monetary financing

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Mario Draghi, the former head of the European Central Bank, took charge of Italy’s new government on Friday and unveiled a cabinet that mixed unaffiliated technocrats with politicians from across his broad coalition. Following a week of consultations, almost all the main parties from across the political spectrum have endorsed Mr Draghi, and he named a number of prominent figures from these various groups as ministers to cement their support.

Once believed to be the top eurosceptic in Italy, League leader Matteo Salvini also gave his backing to the new leadership, securing his party three spots in the new Cabinet.

Luigi Di Maio, the leader of the Five-Star Movement, will remain foreign minister, while Giancarlo Giorgetti, a senior figure in the League party, will be industry minister.

Both parties have endorsed anti-EU ideologies in the past, so their support for the new europhile leader raised some eyebrows in the past few weeks.

Stefano D’Andrea, the leader of the Italian Sovranist Front (FSI) said the move could finally help the populist fight take Italy outside of the bloc.

Speaking to Express.co.uk, Mr D’Andrea said: “Draghi facilitates our fight to leave the European Union because in Italy a circuit of ideas and organisations had been created from the popular base.

“Then some politicians like Salvini and Meloni have grabbed these ideas, in a very crude way misrepresenting them and using them as slogans.

“So they confused people a bit and hindered that process from below.

“The Five-Stars did the same.

“So in my opinion, with the fact that the Five-Stars and Salvini have joined the Draghi government, the movement that wants to regain Italian sovereignty could be facilitated, because a whole series of misunderstandings that had been created will be finally be cleared.

“So even the people who made an effort to leave the EU were pointing their forces in the wrong direction until now.”

The sovranist politician hopes Italy will soon join the UK outside the bloc, claiming the EU is destined to fail.

He added: “I don’t expect anything from the European Union. The worse they do for me the better.

“There is nothing to be done in the European Union. You cannot change treaties, you cannot go back, you cannot restore part of the sovereignty, you cannot abandon the euro.

“You can’t do anything.

“So for an Italian who is critical of the European Union, even if we are not talking about sovereignty the way we (FSI) do it, it is rational not to give the EU any value.

“The European Union has once again shown during this crisis that it never goes back, it only moves forward.”

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He continued: “The European Union is completely irrational, it was built in an irrational way. It was a voluntary attempt to move forward, then the crisis came and they didn’t know what to do.

“Then they had to stipulate treaties that were on the side of the original treaties, then they put them together.

“Then the ECB could not buy the securities but then decided to buy them anyway on the secondary market and, in fact, monetised on them.

“Then Covid arrived and they started printing money again contradicting themselves.

“So what is logical, coherent, meaningful in this attempt that for us is doomed to failure?

“It lacks the material basis, that is, the unity of the people. It lacks a nation, the possibility of redistributing resources and therefore it lacks the possibility of solidarity.

“But unfortunately it will hurt people so much more before it fails.”

President Sergio Mattarella asked Draghi to be prime minister after party wrangling brought down the previous administration, and set him the task of tackling the coronavirus health crisis and economic meltdown pummelling the country.

Andrea Orlando, from the centre-left Democratic Party, will be labour minister.

Some key posts went to non-affiliated technocrats, including Daniele Franco, director-general of the Bank of Italy, who was named as economy minister and Roberto Cingolani, a physicist and IT expert, who was handed the new role of minister for green transition.

There were only eight women in the 23-strong cabinet.

The new team will be sworn in on Saturday, opening the way for debates in both houses of parliament early next week, where Mr Draghi will unveil his policy plans and face votes of confidence — a formality given his cross-party backing.

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