Democrats still searching for answers on Trump's appeal to Latinos in 2020 election

AOC wants payments for migrants over Trump policies

FOX News Congressional Correspondent Chad Pergram reports on the latest.

Former President Donald Trump’s appeal to Latino voters may have been more widespread than originally thought, according to new research.

Democrats touted their focus on increasing turnout among minority voters for the 2020 elections, but Latino voters with low involvement in politics shifted toward Trump, according a new report from Equis Labs, which describes itself as focused on the “Latinx community.”

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“Trump gains seemed to be unique among those identifying as Latino across geography and place of origin,” the researchers wrote.

Trump also “galvanized” conservative Latinas, while liberal Latinas lost enthusiasm about voting, according to the report.

FILE – Trump give a thumbs up to the cheering crowd after a Latinos for Trump Coalition roundtable in Phoenix, in this Sept. 14, 2020 file photo. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Democrat-linked Equis Labs offered various theories about why Trump appealed to Latino voters, including “dog whistle politics & racial status anxiety” and “activation around religion, SCOTUS and QAnon.”

“Neither party should assume that a Hispanic voter who cast a ballot for Trump in 2020 is locked in as a Republican going forward,” the researchers wrote. “Nor can we assume this shift was exclusive to Trump and will revert back on its own.”

Trump’s increased support from Latino voters in 2020 to 2016 was not enough to win him the election, however. President Biden won Latinos by a roughly two-to-one margin, while Trump had the support of roughly one in three, according to exit polls.

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The Trump campaign was outspending the Biden campaign on Spanish-language ads in the run-up to the election.

Nearly 17 million Latinos voted in the 2020 general election, a more than 30% increase compared to 2016, according to UCLA Latino Policy & Politics Initiative data cited by The New York Times.

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