Defeated San Francisco school board member says voters who ousted her are 'aligned with' White supremacists

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San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education President Gabriela López, who lost a recall election this week, said Thursday those who supported her recall are “aligned” with White supremacists. 

López and two fellow board members — Vice President Faauuga Moliga and Commissioner Alison Collins — were all voted out Tuesday in a landslide, with more than 72% of voters opting to recall each of them.

“So if you fight for racial justice, this is the consequence,” López tweeted along with a photo of a Washington Post headline that said she and the two other recalled board members were “seen as too focused on racial justice.”

“Don’t be mistaken, white supremacists are enjoying this. And the support of the recall is aligned with this,” López added. 

“This headline says it all. If you are not outraged, you’re not paying attention.”

López also retweeted a post criticizing a Mother Jones writer for “defending white supremacy in San Francisco” in an article about the recall.

A pedestrian walks past a San Francisco Unified School District office building in San Francisco, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022. Three members of the district’s school board were recalled this week. 
(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

That writer, Clara Jeffrey, said the vote was “to put performance over performativeness.” She criticized San Francisco for its lethargic effort to reopen schools and for a 2021 vote to rename dozens of schools she called “a crowd-sourced embarrassment that placed Dianne Feinstein, Abraham Lincoln and Paul Revere among the names to be stricken.”

Even many San Francisco Democrats backed López’s ouster. That included Mayor London Breed. 

López said, however, that critics of hers and of the school board are doing “[a]nything to dismiss even the discussion of racism.” She added that a much-criticized effort to rename schools started in 2017 “[i]n response to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville.” 

San Francisco Mayor London Breed speaks at a press conference Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2022, in San Francisco about the next steps she will be taking to replace three recalled school board members.
(Gabrielle Lurie/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images)

In a separate Medium post, López said she will continue to be active in San Francisco’s schools. 

“This will not change where we come from, who we are, what we represent, what we have accomplished and what we will continue to do in service of others,” she said. “It’s unfortunate that those emotions were taken advantage of and led to an election costing taxpayers millions and the pouring in of funds from special interest groups. Regardless of our stances on specific issues, that should not circumvent our right to a democratic process.

“I will continue to work within our public schools, with our future teachers and build connections within higher education to advance these positions. I will take my teacher, M.Ed, youngest Latina ever elected, 2-term President, PhD pursuing self to the next fight, and the next, and the next.” 

A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco Dec. 17, 2020. 
(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

Breed is now responsible for appointing replacements for López and the other two recalled school board members. 

“The voters of this city have delivered a clear message that the school board must focus on the essentials of delivering a well-run school system above all else,” Breed said in response to the election results. 

“San Francisco is a city that believes in the value of big ideas, but those ideas must be built on the foundation of a government that does the essentials well,” the mayor continued. “I want to recognize all the parents who tirelessly organized and advocated in the last year. Elections can be difficult, but these parents were fighting for what matters most – their children.”

FOX Business’ Edward Lawrence contributed to this report. 

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