Colorado surpasses 2016 voter turnout rate with 80% of ballots returned from active voters

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Colorado’s secretary of state said that voter turnout has not only surpassed the amount of votes cast in 2016, but nearly 80% of all ballots had been returned to the state by active voters with hours remaining until the polls close.

“As of noon today, 3,003,907 ballots have been returned, for a turnout rate of 79.5% among active registered voters!” Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold said in a tweet Tuesday.

Colorado officials have listed 3.78 million active voters in the Centennial State, which means 2020’s general election is shaping up to set records in voter turnout – already beating 2008's, 2012's and 2016’s presidential cycles in the number of ballots cast, according to the secretary of state’s office.

Colorado did not grant any deadline extensions on when voters' ballots will be accepted, meaning all votes in Colorado are due by 7 p.m. MT tonight.

Though Colorado has traditionally been a swing state, it has trended blue in recent elections with another blue wave expected Tuesday night.

Polling has consistently showed Democratic candidate Joe Biden with a healthy lead over incumbent candidate Donald Trump by 9.5 points, according to RealClearPolitics. 

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Democratic Senate challenger John Hickenlooper could also unseat Republican incumbent candidate Cory Gardner, as he leads by 8.5% in the polls. 

If polling that shows Democrats in the lead in the state Senate and state House are also correct, that would mean the Democratic Party would have control over every elected office in Colorado, including all executive offices. A one-party control has not happened across the board in Colorado since 1936.

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Trump lost Colorado by five points in 2016, so while Biden’s lead is not necessarily unexpected, congressional Democrats have hopefully watched the Senate race in the hopes of gaining another Senate seat to try and win back the majority.

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