A top Capitol security official is resigning after the assault by a pro-Trump mob, and more are expected to go

  • House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, a top Capitol security official, has resigned from his post, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said Thursday afternoon.
  • Pelosi has called for the termination of the Capitol Police chief, who she said is a responsible for Wednesday's security "failure" that allowed Trump supporters to storm the Capitol.
  • Sen. Chuck Schumer, who will soon be the Senate Majority Leader, said he intends to fire the Senate sergeant-at-arms.
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A top congressional security official is resigning after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced Thursday.

Pelosi said that House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, who reports directly to the speaker, has already submitted his resignation, according to multiple reports. Sen. Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat who will soon be the Senate Majority Leader, said that he intends to fire Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Mike Stenger.

"If Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Stenger hasn't vacated the position by then, I will fire him as soon as Democrats have a majority in the Senate," he said in a statement to Politico.

As Democratic leaders in Congress put pressure on the sergeants-at-arms, Pelosi is also calling for the firing of the head of the Capitol Police, Steven Sund. "There was a failure at the top of the Capitol police," Pelosi said at a press conference Thursday afternoon.

Sund issued a statement Thursday in response to the events that unfolded on Wednesday, writing that "Capitol Police officers and our law enforcement partners responded valiantly when faced with thousands of individuals involved in violent riotous actions as they stormed the United States Capitol Building."

He said that protesters attacked police officers with various weapons and even chemical irritants. Sund characterized the riots at the Capitol as being "unlike any I have ever experienced in my 30 years in law enforcement here in Washington, DC."

Sund added that the incident, as well as security planning, policies, and procedures are currently being reviewed.

Current Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement Thursday that "the ultimate blame for yesterday lies with the unhinged criminals who broke down doors, trampled our nation's flag, fought with law enforcement, and tried to disrupt our democracy, and with those who incited them."

He added, though, that there is still a need to address what he called "shocking failure sin the Capitol's security posture and protocols."

The storming of the Capitol by Trump supporters on Wednesday came as congressional leaders were meeting to count and certify President-elect Joe Biden's victory over incumbent President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election.

Prior to the march on the Capitol, the president told a large crowd of his supporters that the election was fraudulent, repeating a number of falsehoods about the election, and told them they should "never concede."

Trump, who did eventually discourage the actions of his supporters at the Capitol while maintaining his defeat was fradulent, has been sharply criticized for inciting Wednesday's riots, and both Pelosi and Schumer have said that the president should be removed from office by either the 25th amendment or impeachment.

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