European markets head for slightly higher open amid U.S. election uncertainty

  • London's FTSE is seen 9 points higher at the open, at 5,880, Germany's DAX is seen 38 points higher at 12,338, France's CAC 40 up 13 points at 4,921 and Italy's FTSE MIB down 38 points higher 19,307, according to IG.

LONDON — European stocks are expected to open broadly higher Thursday as election uncertainty continues in the U.S.

London's FTSE is seen 9 points higher at the open, at 5,880, Germany's DAX is seen 38 points higher at 12,338, France's CAC 40 up 13 points at 4,921 and Italy's FTSE MIB down 38 points higher 19,307, according to IG.

The U.S. election remains the key focus for international investors on Thursday. U.S. stock index futures were higher in early morning trading as investors hoped that the winner of the U.S. presidential election would soon be determined.

Late Wednesday, NBC News projected that former Vice President Joe Biden was the winner in Wisconsin and Michigan, both states that President Donald Trump won in the 2016 presidential election. Biden would then be just 17 Electoral College votes away from winning, NBC News reported Wednesday.

Trump's campaign and the Georgia Republican Party filed a lawsuit Wednesday over the counting of absentee ballots in a Georgia county. That came after the campaign said it had filed suits to halt counting in Michigan and Pennsylvania as well.

Investors in the U.K. will be keeping an eye out for the Bank of England's latest policy decision Thursday morning amid speculation that negative rates are under consideration.

Earnings released early Thursday by French bank Societe Generale showed a net income of 862 million euros ($1.011 billion) for the third quarter, beating analysts who had estimated a net income of 458 million euros for the quarter, according to Refinitiv.

This comes after the French bank reported a net loss of 1.26 billion euros for the second quarter of the year.

Other earnings in Europe come from Commerzbank, Lufthansa, AstraZeneca, Euronext, Unicredit and ING.

CNBC's Lauren Feiner and Silvia Amaro contributed reporting to this story.

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