The Latest: Lawyer says Las Vegas Sands should pay $347M

FILE – In this Sept. 13, 2016 file photo, U.S. billionaire Sheldon Adelson speaks during a news conference for the opening of Parisian Macao in Macau. A jury is set to decide how much Las Vegas Sands Corp. has to pay to a Hong Kong businessman for helping the company open its first Macau resort. Attorneys for Richard Suen and Sands are to provide trial overviews Wednesday, March 13, 2019. Adelson isn’t expected to testify, he’s battling cancer. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)

The Latest on a trial for a Nevada jury to decide how much Las Vegas Sands owes a Hong Kong businessman for helping the U.S. casino company open its first resort in Macau in 2004 (all times local):

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1:20 p.m.

A Hong Kong businessman's attorney says his client deserves almost $347 million for helping Las Vegas Sands Corp. open its first casino in Macau in 2004 even though the client did not have a contract with the company.

Attorney John O'Malley told jurors that Richard Suen (SOO'-ehn) provided Sands executives including billionaire company chief Sheldon Adelson with key introductions to Chinese officials who granted Sands a Macau gambling license.

Lawyers for the U.S. casino company are expected to counter on Wednesday with a figure near $1 million.

A jury will decide how much Suen gets in the case that could last seven weeks.

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Juries ruled in favor of Suen and his company in 2008 and 2013.

The Nevada Supreme Court upheld those decisions but ruled in 2016 that a new jury should decide how much in damages Suen should be awarded.

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7:55 a.m.

A jury in Nevada is set to decide how much Las Vegas Sands Corp. has to pay to a Hong Kong businessman for helping the company open its first Macau resort 15 years ago.

Attorneys for Richard Suen (SOO'-ehn) and Sands are due to provide overviews Wednesday of a trial that could take seven weeks.

Billionaire Sands chief executive Sheldon Adelson isn't expected to testify. He's battling cancer.

This is the third go-around for the case in state court in Las Vegas.

Suen won breach-of-contract judgments in 2008 and 2013, arguing he provided Sands executives with key introductions to Chinese officials.

The Nevada Supreme Court upheld those jury findings but ruled in 2016 that a jury should decide again the damages question.

Suen says he deserves $328 million.

Sands says he's due $1 million.

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