What time new jobs go live – and how long you really have to apply for them

If you’re looking for a new job, 9am on Wednesday is your best bet.

According to research from recruitment app Job Today, more new roles are advertised on Wednesday than any other day of the week – but you’ll need to be quick to get them.

That’s because by 1pm applications are flooding in and decisions about who to call in for interview are being made. In fact, almost half of jobseekers are asked to interview on Wednesday – within 24 hours of of the ad going live.

Job Today co-founder Polina Montano said: “I would always recommend being enthusiastic and start early in the day to look for a role whilst others might be having a lie in.

"Our insight shows that by lunchtime on Wednesday employers will start to receive a flurry of applications so why not get in there first and get noticed.”

Citizen’s Advice tips to find a job – and get a reference

Do your homework – Do a bit digging on what the employer offers to see if matches your priorities. Most employers publish their staff benefits on their website, so you can see how much holiday and parental leave you can get, and how much they pay into your pension. If they don’t have a website, contact the person who’s posted the job ad directly.

Disclosing an illness or disability – You shouldn’t be asked about having an illness or disability during the application process, and you don’t need to disclose this unless you want to. However, if you need reasonable adjustments to be made at an interview let the employer know – the law says they have to be accomodating.

Make sure the job fits your circumstances – All employers need to consider requests for flexible working, but they don’t have to accept it. It’s your call when to make a request about changes to working hours – you could bring it up at interview or when you’re offered the job.

Get your references lined up – An employer usually only gives a firm job offer once they’ve received one or more references.

It’s best to tell your employer you’ve been offered another job and ask them if they’d be happy to provide a reference. Keep the conversation or email professional and friendly so as to avoid any problems down the line if the job offer falls through.

If your current employer refuses, ask your new manager if they will accept a previous employer. Or you could try a school, college or university tutor if you’ve recently left education, or supervisor from any voluntary work you’ve done.

Use up any holiday you’ve got left – There are usually rules around your remaining leave. Check your contract – if it says you should take your leave during your notice period, you can either take the leave or see if your employer will consider paying you holiday pay instead. If it’s not specified, they may still ask you to take time off – but they need to give you notice to do so.

Getting a bad reaction from your employer – Most employers will handle your resignation sensibly, but Citizens Advice has heard reports where rogue bosses sack someone soon after they resign. This is against the law and you may be able to take them to court for unfair dismissal. If this happens, contact your local Citizens Advice who can help you navigate this process.

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